MPL 2.0

The MPL 2.0 (Mozilla Public License 2.0) is designed to balance the interests of both open-source and proprietary software development. It allows for the use of MPL-licensed code in open-source and proprietary projects, but any modifications to the MPL-licensed code

LGPLv2

The GNU Lesser General Public License version 2.0 (LGPLv2) is an open-source software license that governs the use, distribution, and modification of software projects. It is a permissive free software license approved by the Free Software Foundation (FSF). The LGPLv2

GPLv2

The GNU General Public License version 2.0 (GPLv2) is an open-source software license developed by the Free Software Foundation (FSF) that governs the use, distribution, and modification of software projects. It is a strong copyleft license, meaning any software derived

AGPLv3

The GNU Affero General Public License version 3.0 (AGPLv3) is an open-source software license developed by the Free Software Foundation (FSF) that governs the use, distribution, and modification of software projects. It is an extension of the GNU General Public

Copyleft License

A copyleft license is a type of open-source software license that aims to ensure that the freedoms provided by the license are passed on to subsequent users and developers. It achieves this by requiring any modified or extended versions of

Granting express patent licenses

“Granting express patent licenses” refers to the act of officially and explicitly giving permission or authorisation for others to use, make, sell, or distribute a patented technology or invention. This authorisation is typically provided by the patent holder, who is

What are some of the best practices for open source software?

Some of the best practices for open source software are:License: Open source software should have a clear and appropriate license that defines the terms and conditions of the use, modification, or distribution of the products, and that protects the rights

How can firms leverage open data ecosystems (ODECOs) for value creation and capture?

Firms can leverage ODECOs for value creation and capture by: providing or consuming open data that can be used for various purposes, such as improving decision making, enhancing products and services, solving problems, or generating insights; developing or adopting open